Skip to main content

Monthly Munch: March 2015

Snow.  Solar eclipse.  Spring flowers.  Spotty baby.  Seeds.  Simnel cake.  Showers and sunshine.  Star charts.  Soup.

Toby

Watching the solar eclipse at his preschool
 - likes telling jokes, although they are mostly complete non sequiturs.  And I can't quite tell if he gets the punch line, when I tell him one back!

Admiring aero engines
- announces what he is planning to dream about every night.

- reads every sign we walk past.  We are trying to persuade him that "Caution" is not pronounced "Cuttin".
My booky boys!

- achieved some toilet goals he's been resisting for ages with the help of a star chart.  If I'd known it would only take five stickers and a piece of chocolate, I would have done it months ago!

Quotes

Graham: "What are you thinking about?"

Toby: "I'm thinking dot dot dot.  That's when you're not really thinking about anything."

He fell over and was howling: "Oh!  Oh!  Mummy!"  Then he paused: "Why aren't any tears coming out of my eyes?"  Because that's complete fake crying, little one!

Toby: "I'm sitting here like a lemon."
Me: "Why are you like a lemon?"
Toby: "Because I'm all shivery."
Well, they do live in the fridge, I suppose.

Theo

Fenced in at Elvaston Castle
 - loves sitting by the front door waving at people.

- is a complete toilet fanatic.  He makes a beeline for the bathroom every time you put him down upstairs!  The lid is staying closed rather a lot, now.

- has unfortunately now realised that he doesn't have to lie still when you put him on his changing mat, but can flip over and make a break for it.  To be fair, it did take him a long time, so I'm not complaining (much)!

Mmm, coffee!

- got spots, although not any of the usual diseases involving spots.  The doctor took one look and said, "Antibiotics" - and sure enough, they worked.

- occasionally stands up without holding onto anything, but usually when he's concentrating on something else, so we're not quite sure he realises he can do it!

With a goal in mind.

Thankful for:


- a brief visit from my brother, whom I don't get to see very often.

With Uncle John

- getting to go to a very interesting and informative conference about refugees and asylum seekers.

- a Bollywood film night with friends.  My first Bollywood experience, so I was glad I was watching with people who could fill in some of the references!

- a fun and successful Easter party at the playgroup I help at.  I had recklessly agreed to make chocolate nests, which, amazingly, didn't result in chocolate over a five-metre radius.

Recipe of the Month - Parsnip, Apple and Coconut Soup



I'm sitting here writing this in a sleeveless top, with the patio door wide open to let the sweet springtime air in.  However, most of March was still definitely soup weather.  The coconut milk adds a nice flavour and a velvety creaminess.

1 lb parsnips
1 large apple
vegetable stock
1/2 can (about 200 ml) coconut milk
Desiccated coconut, to serve

Peel and chop the parsnips.  Peel, core and chop the apple.  Put in a large pan and add just enough stock to cover.  Bring to the boil and simmer for about 20 minutes, until the parsnips are soft.
Puree in a blender, adding the coconut milk and seasoning.  Sprinkle a little desiccated coconut over each bowl of soup.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hell is still hot?

  Sometimes it's good when people say things we disagree with. Not always; it can be irritating, frustrating, or wounding. But sometimes it arouses our curiosity, causes us to examine our assumptions, and sets us off on a trail of new discoveries. So it was when somebody posted this image on Facebook.   It says, in emphatic block capitals: We need preachers who preach that hell is still hot, that heaven is still real, that sin is still wrong, that the Bible is God's word, and that Jesus is the only way of salvation. After my initial reaction of, "We certainly do not! " the curiosity kicked in. What was it about this particular formulation of the Christian faith that I didn't like? If I wouldn't preach that, what would I preach? Given that hell is not a major topic of the Bible, how on earth did we get Christians who think it merits headline billing in the gospel? What's wrong with it? Picking something apart is always the easy bit. I partly object to what

National Forest Way: Final Thoughts

As you may have gathered from my blog posts, I've really enjoyed walking the National Forest Way. I found myself eagerly anticipating each walk, and happily inking the route on the map when I'd done it. The National Forest Way is an ideal starter long-distance walk. There are no enormous mountains or exposed cliff edges. The route is never too far from a village, a car park, or a cafe. But there are some lovely views over sunny fields, some beautiful patches of woodland, and some industrial history along the way. I very rarely found it boring.   An advantage that I didn't appreciate when I started is that the Way forms a giant zigzag. This means it fits 75 miles of path into a relatively compact space, making it easy to reach all of it. From my home in south Derbyshire, every section was within a 40 minute drive. The distance between Beacon Hill and the National Memorial Arboretum is only about 25 miles. The countryside is lovely, and generally overlooked in favour of the P

Interior Castle: Spiritual Formation Book 11

"We cannot enter by any efforts of our own; His Majesty must put us right into the centre of our soul, and must enter there Himself."   St Teresa of Avila reluctantly began to write Interior Castle (or The Mansions ) in 1577, complaining that "this writing under obedience tires me and makes my head worse". She set herself to the task of explaining her vision of the soul being like "a castle made of a single diamond... in which there are many rooms, just as in Heaven there are many mansions".  Her writing is engaging but dense; I found it difficult to read more than about ten pages at a time. She also has a habit of introducing terms like favours or intellectual visions and talking about them for a while, before finally defining what they mean several chapters later. This gets confusing. On the other hand, St Teresa is good at thinking of illustrations to explain what she means. She frequently exclaims that these visions are impossible to describe to any