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National Vegetarian Week

After mentioning all those vegetarian options for May in my blog, I figured I should actually do one of them.  So last week (well, Monday to Saturday) was vegetarian week in our house.  I have to confess, it didn't involve as many exciting new recipes as I might like to pretend, but there you go.  Vegetarianism in real life.

(Breakfast is basically cereal and toast except Saturday when I made banana pancakes.)

Monday
Lunch: Barbequed courgette (grilled zucchini), refried bean and cheese quesadilla
We'd had a barbeque on Saturday and I cooked some courgette strips.  There were some left over that went rather well in a quesadilla.

Dinner: Frozen vegetable bakes, oven chips, baked beans, salad
Quick and easy - we were heading out to Toby's preschool parents' evening.

Tuesday
Lunch: Cottage cheese open-faced roll with cucumber and tomato

Dinner: Omelette filled with courgette and mushrooms, mashed potatoes, salsa
I hoped to get a photo of this one, but it came out a complete mess.  Omelettes are one of the few things I really don't cook well.

Wednesday
Lunch: Crumpet pizzas (crumpets spread with tomato puree and topped with grated cheese)

Dinner: Vegetable and lentil bulghar wheat, mint and cucumber raita, naan bread
Finally, a photo-worthy meal!  The naan was bought but the other recipes were from Anjum's Indian Vegetarian Feast.

Thursday
Lunch: Peanut butter sandwich, some kind of "healthy" crisps, fruit
Toby was off preschool, so we caught the bus to Burton-on-Trent and had a picnic in the park.

Dinner: Pizza, raw vegetables with hummus, baked beans
I bought a couple of frozen pizzas and we decorated them with peppers, olives, tomatoes and sweetcorn.  (Graham put tuna and hot sauce on his bit).


Friday
Lunch: Leftover veg and lentil bulghar
Aren't leftovers great?

Dinner: Sweet potato and mozzarella burger, chips, coleslaw and salad
We ate out at a local chain pub with a good children's play area.  They have an extensive menu, so I had a choice of about half a dozen veggie options, ranging from comforting macaroni cheese to a more sophisticated red pepper and red pesto tart.

Saturday
Lunch: Leftover veg and lentil bulghar
...again, because I kept forgetting to remind Graham to take his portion to work.  Maybe leftovers aren't soooo great.

Dinner: Homemade falafel in wraps with hummus and Greek yoghurt, and an avocado and grapefruit salad.
First time I've made falafel from scratch.  I used the recipe from Mumsnet, more or less, although why you would bother with all the grating and fine chopping when it then specifies a food processor is beyond me.  Either you have far too much time on your hands or you really don't trust your food processor.


And on Sunday we went to a friend's house for a very delicious meal of roast beef.  Well, I did say I was flexitarian, didn't I?

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