Skip to main content

Chex Mixed

When we lived in America, we occasionally got to confuse people with our strange English habits, such as putting butter on sandwiches or eating baked beans as part of breakfast.  Now that we're back in the UK, we occasionally get to confuse people with the strange things we learnt across the pond.

Our small group at church is a wonderful bunch of people, who have helped keep me sane in the craziness of moving to a new place and bringing up two boys.  Between us we represent quite a number of different nationalities, so when we had to set up a table at church to tell people who we are, someone suggested that we could bring food from our respective countries.  A lady of Indian origin volunteered to bring onion bhajis, and I tried to think of something distinctively American.

After flicking through a few recipe books, I settled on Chex mix as something that was well-known in the US, easy to make for a crowd, and unlikely to make a huge mess.  Chex cereal is not easily obtainable here, so I fudged together a recipe with Shreddies, Cheerios, pretzels and nuts, baked it up and got ready to go.

There wasn't much left by the time I realised it might be good to have a photo!

The Sunday in question was one where I was scheduled to wrangle small children in creche.  I dumped the bowl of Chex mix on our group table with little explanation, and ran off to play toy kitchens and sing, "The Wheels on the Bus" umpteen times.  Little did I know how much confusion I was leaving behind.

At the end of the service my bowl was returned to me with, "Well, that sure caused some conversation!" but it wasn't until the next Wednesday meeting that I got, "What on earth was that stuff??"  One guy said, "It looked like cereal without milk, so I tucked in expecting it to be sweet..." and another person's best guess was, "Shreddies covered in Marmite".  When I revealed that the main flavouring was in fact Worcestershire sauce, there was general bemusement that anyone would think of adding that to their breakfast cereal!

I guess Americans do have a greater appreciation of that kind of sweet/savoury combination.  And just to prove that it really is a thing, here's the original manufacturer's recipe.

Chex party mix

Just be glad I didn't decide to try the Surprise Salad recipe.  Ingredients: beetroot, lemon Jello, sugar, mayonnaise and horseradish.  I don't think any number of years living in the States could persuade me to like that one!


Martha's Anglicized Chex mix

4 cups Shreddies
2 cups Cheerios
2 cups mini pretzels
1 cup unsalted mixed nuts (I found cheap ones in the crisp aisle)
4 oz margarine or butter
3 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp Aromat All Purpose Savoury Seasoning (with the spices)
1 tsp hot sauce

Melt the butter or margarine with the seasonings.  Dip a Shreddie in to see if you like it, and add a splash more of anything you feel necessary (I can't honestly remember the quantities I used, so this is only a rough guide!).

Put the cereals, pretzels and nuts in a large bowl.  Stir in the seasoned melted butter.  Spread on a couple of baking trays and bake at 120°C until crispy (maybe half an hour?  I messed up by putting it in too hot an oven, burning half a tray and then leaving the rest in the warming oven to kind of dry out, so I've no idea how long it really should have taken).  Or you can follow the manufacturer's recipe above and try microwaving it instead.

Try not to eat it all at once!

(By the way, the recipe I mostly based this one on had the marvellous name of Mountain Trash!  And yes, that was the same cookbook as the Surprise Salad.)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hell is still hot?

  Sometimes it's good when people say things we disagree with. Not always; it can be irritating, frustrating, or wounding. But sometimes it arouses our curiosity, causes us to examine our assumptions, and sets us off on a trail of new discoveries. So it was when somebody posted this image on Facebook.   It says, in emphatic block capitals: We need preachers who preach that hell is still hot, that heaven is still real, that sin is still wrong, that the Bible is God's word, and that Jesus is the only way of salvation. After my initial reaction of, "We certainly do not! " the curiosity kicked in. What was it about this particular formulation of the Christian faith that I didn't like? If I wouldn't preach that, what would I preach? Given that hell is not a major topic of the Bible, how on earth did we get Christians who think it merits headline billing in the gospel? What's wrong with it? Picking something apart is always the easy bit. I partly object to what

National Forest Way: Final Thoughts

As you may have gathered from my blog posts, I've really enjoyed walking the National Forest Way. I found myself eagerly anticipating each walk, and happily inking the route on the map when I'd done it. The National Forest Way is an ideal starter long-distance walk. There are no enormous mountains or exposed cliff edges. The route is never too far from a village, a car park, or a cafe. But there are some lovely views over sunny fields, some beautiful patches of woodland, and some industrial history along the way. I very rarely found it boring.   An advantage that I didn't appreciate when I started is that the Way forms a giant zigzag. This means it fits 75 miles of path into a relatively compact space, making it easy to reach all of it. From my home in south Derbyshire, every section was within a 40 minute drive. The distance between Beacon Hill and the National Memorial Arboretum is only about 25 miles. The countryside is lovely, and generally overlooked in favour of the P

Interior Castle: Spiritual Formation Book 11

"We cannot enter by any efforts of our own; His Majesty must put us right into the centre of our soul, and must enter there Himself."   St Teresa of Avila reluctantly began to write Interior Castle (or The Mansions ) in 1577, complaining that "this writing under obedience tires me and makes my head worse". She set herself to the task of explaining her vision of the soul being like "a castle made of a single diamond... in which there are many rooms, just as in Heaven there are many mansions".  Her writing is engaging but dense; I found it difficult to read more than about ten pages at a time. She also has a habit of introducing terms like favours or intellectual visions and talking about them for a while, before finally defining what they mean several chapters later. This gets confusing. On the other hand, St Teresa is good at thinking of illustrations to explain what she means. She frequently exclaims that these visions are impossible to describe to any