Skip to main content

Monthly Munch: March

Well, you know what it's like: you wait ages for a blog post and then two come along at once!  Time for the regular news slot again.

Graham took this great photo at Rolleston-on-Dove

First, some family portraits:




Toby
Face painting from a birthday party.  He insisted on the blue butterfly.
 - can pick out words which rhyme, and words which start with the same letter.

- likes sticking stickers on everyone.

- loves playing hide and seek, although his idea of hiding is to tuck his head under something and forget that the rest of him is still visible!

- has got very wet helping to wash Dad's car, Mum's car and Mum's bike.


Quotes:
"If I flash my eyes it looks like thunder." (translation:  If I blink my eyes it looks like lightning.)

Describing an encounter with a neighbour's dog: "And she jumped up and she licked me in the face and I got all covered in dog juice!"

Theo
 - still has bright blue eyes - will he keep them?  Unexpected but not impossible.

- is looking at us and smiling, especially at Toby.  He loves his big brother.

- has started swiping at interesting objects within his reach.


 - is still eating as much milk as anyone will give him!


Thankful for:

- a bike ride with Graham in the beautiful spring weather.  (Thanks to Graham's parents for babysitting!)
And a beer stop, of course!
- friends; this has been a very sociable month.

- the clock change, which meant Toby went from waking up at 6am on the Saturday to almost 8am on the Monday.  Yessss!!!

Recipe of the month: Root Vegetable Rösti

This is the kind of thing that's much easier when you have a food processor that will grate for you.  I made lots and cooked some to freeze.  Quantities are fairly approximate.

100g / 4 oz carrots, grated
100g / 4 oz parsnips, grated
150g / 6 oz floury potatoes (eg Maris Piper), grated
1/2 onion, finely chopped
1 egg
2 tbsp flour
salt and pepper
2 tbsp olive oil

Squeeze out the moisture from the grated vegetables in a clean tea towel.  Tip into a bowl and stir in the onion, egg, flour and seasoning.  (If you can think of some more adventurous seasonings, feel free to add them.)

Heat the olive oil in a frying pan. Add the rösti mix and press down very well to form one large patty.  Fry gently for about 10 minutes, then find a plate that fits on top.  Place over the rosti and turn the pan upside down so the vegetable cake is on the plate.  Slide back into the pan and cook the other side.

Poach four eggs.  Cut the rösti into quarters and top each with an egg.  Baked beans are an obligatory accompaniment for this kind of thing in our house, but you may have other ideas.  Serves 2.

Not the best photo, but it tastes better than it looks.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Baby Language

For some reason baby equipment is an area in which American English differs markedly from British English. As well as learning how to care for a baby, we had to learn a whole new vocabulary! Fortunately we are now fluently bilingual, and I have compiled a handy US-UK baby dictionary for you. Diaper n. Nappy Mom says if you can read this change my diaper. The first time you change one of these you will be all thumbs and stick the little adhesive tabs to yourself, the baby and probably the changing mat before you get them where they ought to go. A few years later you will be able to lasso a running toddler and change them before they even know what's happened (yes, I have seen it done). You will also get through more diapers than you ever thought possible, creating scary amounts of expense and waste. Hence we are now mostly using: Cloth diaper n. Reusable nappy Cool baby. No longer those terry squares, the main drawback is that there are now so many types it can be qu

our new apartment

Moving was a slightly surreal experience given that our new place looks almost exactly the same as the old one, except for being a different layout. That's what you get for living in a throw-'em-up-and-pack-'em-in apartment complex I guess - albeit a very nice one. So, entering apartment 433: To your right is the master bedroom: with en-suite bathroom: and looking back, from your left, that's a walk-in closet, door to the hallway and door to the bathroom: Following the layout so far? OK, go back to the hallway and put your back to the front door again, and this time walk straight forwards into the sitting room: As you can see, ahead of you is the door to the balcony: for which I have grand plans for a herb garden and other plants. Leading off the living room is the dining area: and if you walk through that and round to your right you reach the kitchen: Go back through the living room again: and if you turn right (

Speedy Steamed Pudding

One of the highlights of being in catered halls for a couple of years at university was the sponge puddings. Great big sheets of chocolate or vanilla sponge, carved into hefty blocks and doused with thick custard. The main courses were edible at best, but those puddings would fill you up for a week. Good solid puddings, whether baked, steamed or boiled, have been a mainstay of English cooking for centuries. Something about the cold, damp, dark winters inspired British cooks to endless variations on suet, jam, currants, custard and other comforting ingredients. Once I left the nurturing environs of my parents' house and university halls, pudding stopped being an everyday affair and became a more haphazard, if-I-feel-like-making-any event. And steamed puddings especially, with their two hours over simmering water, don't really lend themselves to spur of the moment dessert-making. However, technology has moved on since those first days of puddings. I'd been vaguely