Skip to main content

Chocolate Ginger Hobnobs


For the past few years, I have been taking part in International Homemade Hobnob Day.  This year I was a little late, but tried to make up for it by experimenting with new options.  A few weeks later I had to make 4 dozen cookies for a church cookie sale, and after the dismal failure of my attempt at a new recipe, I resorted to these tried and tested Chocolate Ginger Hobnobs.

8 oz / 2 sticks margarine
1 tbsp golden syrup (or corn syrup)
1 tbsp hot water
1/2 tsp bicarb/ baking soda
8 oz / 1 3/4 cups self-raising flour
8 oz / 1 cup sugar
8 oz / 2 1/2 cups rolled / quick oats
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1 oz / 3 tbsp finely chopped crystallized ginger

Melt margarine and syrup.  Mix water and soda together in a cup and add to margarine mixture.  Add remaining ingredients and mix well with a wooden spoon.  Form into small balls, place on baking tray and flatten slightly.  Bake at 180C / 350F for 15 minutes.  Melt 100g / 3.5 oz dark chocolate with 1 tbsp butter and drizzle over the cookies, using a piping bag or spoon.  Leave to set.  Enjoy.  Makes about 30.

Comments

Fat Dormouse said…
Mmmmmmmm! These look lovely! Sigh. Yet another recipe I will have to try making!!!
Sally Eyre said…
Just made some. Didn't have the stem ginger so I just doubled the powedered ginger. Not getting a chance to add the choc as the kids are demolishing them! I've got 60 from that recipe at a decent size, so I've no idea how huge your cookies must be to only get 30! Thanks.

Popular posts from this blog

Bonnie Prince Charlie Walk: Lees to Derby

These final two Bonnie Prince Charlie walks were quite a contrast: the first across empty fields and along quiet roads; the second crossing from country into city as I walked into Derby. I started both walks at the Great Northern Greenway car park, just off Station Road in Mickleover.  Walk 1 In order to keep walking the Bonnie Prince Charlie way in the right direction, I first found my way back to Lees by an alternative route. The first section, along the cycle path, was well paved. After that it quickly got very muddy. At least it's a popular walk from Mickleover to Radbourne, so it was easy to find the path.  St Andrew's, Radbourne, is rather dominated by memorials. It looks as if the preacher would be hemmed in by tombs!      I liked this bench outside, with the text, "The thoughtful soul to solitude retires". Writing this, I only just realised it was a quote. Turns out it's from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam . The rest of the walk certainly provided solitude,

A Place at the Table: Spiritual Formation Book 12

"God has ordained in his great wisdom and goodness that eating, and especially eating in company, should be one of the most profound and pleasurable aspects of being human." Miranda Harris had been intending to write a book for years. She'd got as far as a folder full of notes when she died suddenly in a car accident in 2019. When her daughter, Jo Swinney, found the notes, she decided to bring her mum's dream to fruition. A Place at the Table was the result. I thought this was going to be a nice friendly book about having people over for dinner. In one sense it is, but it's pretty hard-hitting as well. Miranda and her husband Peter co-founded the environmental charity A Rocha, so the book doesn't shy away from considering the environmental aspects of what we eat and how we live. They also travelled widely and encountered hunger at close quarters; the tension between seeing such poverty and believing in a generous God comes out clearly in A Place at the Table.

Bonnie Prince Charlie Walk: Longford to Lees and BONUS walk

The walk from Longford to Lees didn't include any churches. That was frankly not on. So I found an extra walk which included not one, not two, but three churches. Also it was shorter, because I didn't have time to fit in a longer walk that week. The next week I managed the churchless section of the Bonnie Prince Charlie Walk. It was a little more adventurous than I expected! Walk 1 (Three Churches) For this route I followed the directions given by Dave Welford on his very useful blog . As soon as I parked up by Sutton-on-the-Hill church, I heard the bleating of lambs. Spring must be coming. number 11 mum and baby   I crossed a field full of numbered lambs and ewes and came out in the middle of Sutton village. Turning left by the village preschool, I picked up another footpath to take me across the fields to Dalbury. A ruined cottage stood crumbling lonesomely - the Gamekeeper's Cottage, apparently.  I was amused by Dave Welford's comments about the miserable farmer who