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Monthly Munch: February 2017

Most of the photos this month were either of Theo's birthday or our short break in the Lake District, which I will tell you about soon, I promise.  We also went for a walk up Streatley Hill with my parents (last time we did that, Toby was in a baby sling!) and ate both British and American pancakes on Shrove Tuesday.  And finally, the spring flowers are starting to appear!  My favourite time of year.



Toby


- has become very interested in big numbers, especially googolplex.  He wanted to know whether googolplex was larger than infinity.

- is getting quite good at an app called Cute Munchies, a logic puzzle where you navigate small creatures round a kind of maze.

- enjoyed looking at VERY EXPENSIVE cars with Graham, on a recent visit to my parents'.  (No, we haven't suddenly got rich.)


- can ride one-handed on his bike.

- found the biggest tyre ever at Lakeland Motor Museum.


Theo


- is getting going on his balance bike pretty well

- calls fried eggs "Friday eggs".  He used to call boiled eggs "eggshell eggs" and still prefers them to any other kind.

Where's my eggs?

- visited a friend's house and wore her child-size oven mitts the whole time.  Do you think naming him after a chef has had an effect?

- loves wearing the Batman mask he got in a McDonalds meal - although he usually refers to it as Super Spy Chase from Paw Patrol.



Thankful for:

- being able to join a new Christian writers' group - it was fascinating to meet so many people writing in so many different ways.

- getting to play a National Trust grand piano at Rufford Old Hall.

Glad I don't have to wear one of these, though!
- help and advice from several people as I'm trying to kickstart my career again.

Recipe of the Month: Chocolate Cherry Trifle


I'd had some chocolate cake offcuts in the freezer for so long I couldn't even remember which cake they came from.  So I thought it was about time to use them for something delicious.  Here is my very precise and elegant trifle recipe.

Bits of chocolate cake
1 packet black cherry jelly (Jello)
Custard powder, sugar and milk (or ready-made custard, or vanilla pudding mix)
Sugar sprinkles
Squirty cream

Make the custard first so it has more time to cool.  Follow the packet instructions to make 1 pint, going generous on the custard powder to make it nice and thick.  Set aside to cool.

Break or chop the cake into chunks and put in the bottom of a large bowl.  You don't want it too packed in - mine came out a bit solid because I was trying to use the cake up, but if I'd had some canned cherries I would have used less cake and added the fruit.

Make the jelly following the packet instructions.  Pour over the cake and put in the fridge to set.  If the cake was frozen this obviously speeds up the setting process.

When the jelly is set and the custard is at least lukewarm, if not completely cold, remove any skin from the custard and pour it over the jelly layer.  Press clingfilm over the custard to prevent any more skin forming.  Refrigerate until cold.

If everyone likes cream, you can put proper whipped cream all over the top.  Half the people in my house won't eat it, so I put sprinkles over the custard and let the boys add squirty cream as they wished (a great treat!).

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